Zuckerberg agrees to closed-door talks with MEPs

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has agreed to meet European Union parliamentarians in Brussels to give evidence about the company's use of personal data. And several of the US lawmakers often appeared to fail to grasp the technical details of Facebook's operations and data privacy.

Facebook admitted earlier this month that up to 87 million users may have had their data hijacked by British consultancy Cambridge Analytica, which worked for US President Donald Trump during his 2016 campaign.

While Zuckerberg testified last month to the U.S. Congress, he had always been noncommittal on his appearance in Europe, sending his chief technical officer to speak to the British parliament and delaying confirmation of any visit to Brussels.

He might get tougher questions in Brussels, where an assertive new European data protection law comes into effect on May 25.

As opposed to the very public U.S. congressional hearings, the Brussels meeting will take place behind closed doors, where Zuckerberg will be questioned by parliamentarians.

Yet the question of whether Zuckerberg should explain himself publicly remains a point of contention.

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In a statement, Facebook said that it welcomed the chance to meet MEPs and "appreciate the opportunity for dialogue, to listen to their views and show the steps we are taking to better protect people's privacy".

As Vera Jourova, the European commissioner for justice and consumers, put it in a tweet, it's a pity the Facebook founder does not believe all Europeans deserve to know how their data is handled by his company.

Mr Zuckerberg is also confirmed to visit French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris on May 23, along with other tech leaders, according to the French presidency.

Facebook "has been somewhat responsive during the controversy, but shareholders should continue to closely monitor data privacy issues", ISS says.

Mark Zuckerberg has accepted an invitation to appear before the European Parliament in a closed-door session over the Cambridge Analytica scandal surrounding his firm, despite yet again refusing to be questioned by MPs in the UK. While Nix has testified once to the committee, lawmakers want him to give further evidence - a request he had previously declined.

In March, UK Conservative lawmaker Damian Collins demanded Zuckerberg provide evidence to the Commons committee pertaining to the Cambridge Analytica scandal, but the billionaire refused, opting to only front the US Congress.

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