Trump defends vulgar remarks while partly denying them

Share

But US Senator Richard Durbin, Democrat of IL, one of six lawmakers who were in the meeting Thursday, at the White House, on immigration with Trump, confirmed reports of the president's remarks.

US Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of SC, said in a statement that he had confronted Trump during the meeting, but he did not publicly condemn his remarks.

When it came to talk of extending protections for Haitians, Durbin said Trump replied: "We don't need more Haitians'".

Trump took particular issue with the idea that people who'd fled to the US after disasters in places such as El Salvador, Guatemala and Haiti would be allowed to stay as part of the deal, according to the people, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to publicly describe the discussion.

And Haiti's USA ambassador told the BBC that Haitians are not "simply immigrants who come here to take advantage of the U.S".

President Trump has since rejected the claims against him in a series of tweets but White House communicators have however failed to categorically deny that he made those comments.

It should come as no surprise that someone who began his campaign by using derogatory and racist remarks against Mexican immigrants would denigrate entire countries like El Salvador and Haiti and the continent of Africa, but as Americans, we have to be better than that.

"The words used by the president, as related to me directly following the meeting by those in attendance, were not 'tough, ' " he said, taking issue with the president's tweet. The young people are human beings, not commodities, he said.

"For the American President who said he would be Haiti's greatest champion.to stand up and make such a comment at this time. leaves me reeling", community activist Gepsie Metellus said.

In 2009 Trump's predecessor, Barack Obama, chose Ghana's capital Accra to set out his foreign policy goals for Africa in a speech in which he said he saw Africa "as a fundamental part of our interconnected world".

Dabo Swinney reveals first-round prospect Clelin Ferrell, others coming back
Four members of the Clemson Tigers have chose to remain with the team and forgo their opportunity to enter the 2018 NFL Draft. The Clemson Tigers season ended in the college football playoff at the hands of eventual national champion Alabama.

"I can not believe that in the history of the White House, in that Oval Office, any president has ever spoken the words that I personally heard our president speak yesterday", Durbin said.

The word "shithole" was projected onto President TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse Democrat slams Donald Trump Jr. for "serious case of amnesia" after testimony Skier Lindsey Vonn: I don't want to represent Trump at Olympics Poll: 4 in 10 Republicans think senior Trump advisers had improper dealings with Russia MORE's D.C. hotel Saturday.

The tentative deal also addresses border security, including a border wall, the diversity visa lottery and chain migration, in which USA green-card holders can sponsor other family members for permanent residence in the country.

He is also a design engineer in the defense industry and a Haitian immigrant who says the portrayal of his country is offensive. "He said, 'Oh, that's a good line'".

Developing countries do have difficulties, but they are not "s**thole countries", said ANC Deputy General Secretary Jessie Duarte, calling Trump's remarks "unfortunate".

"I'm sorry, but there's no other word one can use but racist".

But Trump on Friday insisted the reports were inaccurate.

"Ours is not a s**thole country, neither is Haiti or any other country in distress", said Duarte. "Never said 'take them out.' Made up by Dems". I have a wonderful relationship with Haitians.

Sens. David Perdue, R-Ga., and Tom Cotton, R-Ark., who attended Thursday's meeting, issued a statement saying they "do not recall the president saying these comments specifically". "They were abhorrent and repulsive".

Share