Saudi Arabia Welcomes Hamas, Fatah Reconciliation Deal

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Palestinian rivals Fatah and Hamas began detailed negotiations behind closed doors in Cairo on Tuesday on ending their crippling decade-long split, a delegate said.

Thursday's signing came after two days of negotiations in the Egyptian capital on the governing of the Gaza Strip as part of the most serious effort to date to end the 10 year rift between the rival Palestinian groups.

China's foreign ministry spokesman, Hua Chunying, expressed appreciation of the Egyptian role in consolidating the Palestinian reconciliation, adding that the latest progress will resume Palestinian-Israeli peace talks, MENA added.

The Hamas chief briefed the Emir on the results of the reconciliation agreement concluded between Fatah and Hamas movements.

The Islamists of Hamas and the West Bank-based Fatah movement of Palestinian president Mahmud Abbas have been at odds since they fought a near civil war in 2007.

Man used meat cleaver to kill wife, injure mother-in-law, police say
Gurung was being held on suspicion of second-degree murder and attempted murder, the Free Press reported. Her mother, Thulsa Rimal, 54, was hospitalized at UVM Medical Center in stable condition.

Ismail Haniyeh said in a statement that details would be announced in Cairo later on Thursday.

On the fuel crisis in Gaza, the two sides have initially agreed that Egypt and Israel will supply fuel to the enclave until a final deal on the matter is reached.

Signed in the presence of Egyptian General Intelligence Director Khaled Fawzy, the agreement includes deployment of 3,000 Palestinian Authority police officers in Gaza, to patrol the borders with Israel and also the Rafah crossing between the Gaza Strip and Egypt, and the handover of Gaza administration from Hamas to the Palestinian unity government no later than December 1.

The deal did not address the issue of arms of resistance.

Hamas's agreement to transfer administrative powers in Gaza to a Fatah-backed government marked a major reversal, prompted partly by its fears of financial and political isolation after its main patron and donor, Qatar, plunged in June into a major diplomatic dispute with key allies like Saudi Arabia.

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