Ireland approves massive Apple data centre

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It is been two years since Apple announced plans to build two data centres in Europe - one in Denmark and one on Coillte owned lands in Athenry.

The decision was made by Justice Paul McDermott, who ruled that Apple should be granted permission to build the data centre, despite objections from local residents.

The data centre project has been plagued by delays since it was announced in 2015.

On Sunday Patently Apple posted a report titled "A Hardy Group of Irishman from Athenry attended a Rally today Supporting Apple's Proposed Data Centre". An Apple facility in Denmark announced at the same time is near completion, while the construction of the Athenry site has not yet begun.

The US firm met five key concerns previous year, but were held up again by appeals from three local residents, raising doubts that it would ever be approved.

The following September, Galway County Council gave permission for it to proceed subject to conditions, but that decision was subsequently appealed to An Bord Pleanála.

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A number of local residents challenged An Bord Pleanála's decision amid concerns it hadn't carried out the necessary environmental assessment although the majority of Athenry residents are in favour the development and say it will secure the town's future.

Garry Connolly, Founder and President, Host in Ireland, told Data Economy: "We are delighted that the planning process has had a successful outcome for the Apple Data Hosting Centre in Galway".

Without even having started to power Apple's services, the company's data centre in Athenry has already made some profound changes in Irish regulations and citizens involvement.

Apple managed to get the case fast-tracked through Ireland's Commercial Court after it filed a request last November.

A decision on Apple's Irish data centre was expected to be passed in July but a shortage of High Court judges pushed the verdict back to October.

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