Donald Trump condemns Justice Department over 'watered down' travel ban

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Sixteen states filed briefs with the Supreme Court on Monday asking that President Donald Trump's travel ban policy be reinstated, saying his executive order was "emphatically not a 'Muslim ban'".

"The Justice Dept. should have stayed with the original Travel Ban, not the watered down, politically correct version they submitted to S.C.", added Trump, according to CNN.

The lower courts have cited Trump's own statements, primarily on the campaign trail a year ago, that the order should be seen as a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States" to reject the ban.

Pointing to the terrorist attack in London over the weekend, Trump said on Twitter on June 5 that "we need the Travel Ban as an extra level of safety!"

"Sad", wrote George Conway, a high-profile conservative lawyer who recently withdrew his name from consideration for a top Justice Department post and husband of Trump's advisor Kellyanne Conway.

Conway was referring to the Office of the Solicitor general, who argues cases before the Supreme Court, and who today will be filing a brief defending Trump's Muslim travel ban.

Outside the courts, the travel ban is a hot political issue.

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"The Executive Order classifies aliens by nationality - not religion". He seemed to criticize the Justice Department for not seeking a "much tougher version". Critics have assailed the ban as discriminatory and that his reasoning for it is flawed.

Conway again stressed, however, that the president's tweets "seriously undermine" his own administration's agenda, a point that has also been made by other legal experts.

"Well first of all its not a travel ban", White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer told reporters January 31, four days after the rollout of the first Executive Order. The appellate court ruling specifically referenced Trump's stump speeches that called for a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States".

"The president has his own unique ways of communicating with the American people, and the world", Tillerson said during a visit to New Zealand."And it's served him pretty well, and I don't intend to advise him on how to communicate".

Accusing Trump of bias, they said the US President did not take action against those countries due to vested interest, citing his business ties with the Gulf.

In subsequent tweets, Conway noted that he "VERY, VERY STRONGLY" supports Trump and his wife.

That comment, at the conclusion of a fundraiser for Ford's Theater, addressed the vehicle and knife attack that killed at least seven people in London.

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